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What happens if you die without a Will?

Region: Ontario Answer Number: 150

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If you die without a Will, the law says that you have died “intestate,” which means that you left no instructions as to how your property is to be divided and distributed. In these circumstances, the Ontario Succession Law Reform Act governs how your property will be distributed to your surviving relatives. Even if you want your property divided according to provincial law, you should still have a Will because it will reduce delays and expenses involved in wrapping up your affairs.

 

How your property will be distributed

According to the Act, if you die without a Will, your property will be distributed as follows:

1) If you have a spouse, but no children:

Your spouse inherits everything. This only applies to legally married spouses. Common-law spouses do not automatically receive anything if you die without a Will.

2) If you have a spouse and children:

Your spouse first takes a preferential share up-to $200,000 worth of assets. Anything left over is called the residue. If anything is left over, it is divided between your spouse and your children as follows: If there is only one child, your spouse and child each receive half of the residue of the estate; if there is more than one child, your spouse receives one-third of the residue and the children share the remainder equally.

3) If you have children, but no spouse:

The children each inherit an equal portion of your estate.

4) If you no spouse and no children:

Your parents inherit your entire estate.

5) If you have no spouse, no children, and no parents:

Your brothers and sisters (or their children if any brothers and sisters have died) divide your estate.

6) If you also have no brothers and sisters:

Your nieces and nephews each inherit an equal portion of your estate.

7) If you have no nieces and nephews:

All other next of kin inherit an equal portion of your estate.

8) If you have no living next of kin:

Your estate goes to the Ontario government.

Problems that arise when someone dies without a Will

Dying without a Will can create problems for those you leave behind. First, your property will be divided according to the law, which may not be the same as how you would have divided it. Second, there will be extra time delays and expenses involved in wrapping up your affairs, and the court will have to appoint someone to act as your personal representative. The general rule is that your closest relative has the right to be appointed as your personal representative. They are appointed by applying to the court for a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee Without a Will. This gives authority to the personal representative to manage and distribute the estate of the deceased.

As of January 1, 2016, ‘proof of death” must be filed when applying for a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee (with or without a Will). This could be: a death certificate issued by the Registrar General; a Funeral Director’s proof of death certificate; or, an order made under the Declarations of Death Act, 2002 declaring that the person has died.

For more information about Wills and Estate Planning, visit the Ministry of the Attorney General website.

Dealing with the affairs of someone who died without a Will can be a complicated process.

For legal advice and help if someone close to you has died without a Will, or for other estate issues, contact our preferred Wills & Estate lawyers and see who’s right for you: 

Hull & Hull Estate Lawyers

Devry Smith Frank LLP

O'Sullivan Estate Lawyers






Devry Smith Frank Wills & Estates Ontario All Topics Sept 2017Devry Smith Frank Wills & Estates Ontario All Topics Sept 2017

Hull and Hull April 2017 Ontario Wills and Estates Topic 150Hull and Hull April 2017 Ontario Wills and Estates Topic 150

O’Sullivan Wills & Estates Ontario All Topics Sept 2017O’Sullivan Wills & Estates Ontario All Topics Sept 2017



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